Tok felon sentenced to 64 months for firearms seized during 2016 search warrant

SOURCE: MGN

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (KTUU) - A Tok man with four prior felony convictions was sentenced Friday to 64 months in federal prison after authorities seized 32 firearms, some of which were stolen, while executing a search warrant at his home early last year.

According to federal prosecutors, 49-year-old Floyd Julius Stuck is also currently facing charges in state court for drug trafficking evidence arising from the same search warrant. State court records show Stuck is charged with five felonies including weapons misconduct and possession of controlled substances.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office says Stuck was “reported to be the ‘biggest drug pusher’ or dealer in Tok.”

“The Alaska State Troopers obtained a search warrant on Feb. 2, 2016, for Stuck’s property after numerous reports of drug trafficking and other criminal activity,” prosecutors wrote in a Friday press release. “AST found and seized approximately 32 firearms (three of which proved to be stolen), ammunition, as well as numerous additional items of stolen property at Stuck’s Tok residence.”

Prosecutors say investigators also found evidence that Stuck had been trafficking heroin, meth, prescription opiates, marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

“The investigation further revealed that Stuck accepted stolen firearms and other stolen property as payment for the drugs he was selling,” the U.S. Attorney's Office said.

Stuck pleaded guilty to the federal charges in March. Senior U.S. District Judge Ralph R. Beistline handed down the 64-month sentence along with three years of supervised release and 80 hours of community service.

According to court documents, all four of Stuck’s prior felony convictions were in the state of Oregon and include second degree burglary, first degree failure to appear in court and possession of heroin and meth. His earliest felony conviction was in 1991.



 
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