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Curious astronomers brave the cold to see the Super Wolf Blood moon

 A curious astronomer looks through a telescope to see the Super Wolf Blood moon up close and personal.
A curious astronomer looks through a telescope to see the Super Wolf Blood moon up close and personal. (KTUU)
Published: Jan. 20, 2019 at 10:29 PM AKST
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Its foreboding name didn't keep Alaskans from taking in the rare spectacle of the Super Wolf Blood moon Sunday.

NASA is currently not operating because of the partial government shutdown, but volunteer NASA solar system ambassadors are still teaching about the stars at the Anchorage Museum's Thomas Planetarium.

Science Education Manager at Anchorage Museum Aaron Slonecker talked about just how rare the Super Wolf Blood moon is.

"The next total lunar eclipse that even touches part of Alaska isn't until 2021, so it’s a few years away,” Slonecker said. “And the next ‘super’ lunar eclipse, I'm not sure when that happens. But, yeah, it's a rare thing and it's cool to look at."

The full eclipse stole the show away from the constellations Sunday night. A handful of curious astronomers braved the cold to see the red moon up close and personal -- that is, before the fog set in.

Anchorage resident James Galloway said in the ten years he’s lived in Alaska, this was the first time he was able to take in the natural phenomenon.

"What better day to do it?” Galloway said. “Get to see this lunar eclipse, learn about all the constellations that are going on, and all of the individual meanings for the whole phrase 'Super Wolf Blood wolf moon.’"

Much of North and South America saw the red giant Sunday night. Channel 2’s Tracy Sinclare

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