Iditarod musher uses sound therapy to help his dogs recover

Veteran Iditarod musher Jeremy Keller has a unique way of caring for his team - biofield tuning.
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UNALAKLEET, Alaska (KTUU) - Iditarod mushers have their own ways of doing things, from how they feed and train their dogs to how they ensure their canine athletes recover from bumps, bruises and sore muscles.

Veteran Iditarod musher Jeremy Keller has a unique way of caring for his team - biofield tuning.

The McCarthy-based musher places a resonating tuning fork on sore spots on his dog's bodies to help his dogs recover by sound therapy.

"I'm very, very new to it," said Keller who finished one Iditarod in 2007. "I'm a super open-minded chap but even I hard time wrapping my mind around some of the efficacy of it and what's going on."

Keller says his wife Allie has been training in biofield turning and has been trialing it on their dogs. She places the fork on a dog's back and hips and "the dogs just eat it up," said Keller.

"Holding an activated tuning fork in the area of a traumatic memory or another difficult time period produces repeatable, predictable outcomes," reads the description of how the therapy works on McKusick's website.

"The sound input seems to help the body digest and integrate unprocessed experiences. As the biofield dissonance subsides, clients generally report feeling "lighter" and a diminishment or resolution of their symptoms."

The therapy was founded by Eileen McKusick who turned her study of sound therapy into a Master's thesis.

The Keller family starred in the reality television show 'Edge of Alaska' for four seasons.



 
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